Trader Joe's Ex-Prez Wants To Sell Expired Food

Doug Rauch, the former president of Trader Joe's, is planning to open a store that will sell expired food. Wait, don't run off just yet! It's actually a good thing.

The Natural Resources Defense Council's food and agriculture program released a study last year, reporting that Americans throw away almost half of their food every year, accounting for a waste of about $165 billion.

Spurred on by their findings, Rauch plans to open a combination grocery store and restaurant that will sell prepared food, fruits and veggies that have all been rejected by other stores but are still perfectly healthy.

"We're talking about taking and recovering food," he told NPR. "Most of what we offer will be fruits and vegetables that have a use-by date on it that'll be several days out."

Rauch hopes that the store can become a place where low-income families can find healthy food, since most cheap food currently available isn't very nutritious. Still, despite acknowledging that Rauch has his heart in the right place, some have pointed out the store could face difficulties based on people's ideas about food.

"One challenge facing Rauch's project is that the food will be perceived as garbage that better-off people would never want to eat," wrote The Huffington Post's Barbara Haber. "Even though most foods are still safe and healthy at expiration dates, people tend to believe that they are not, so Rauch's project is going to meet some challenges."

For more:

- See this Huffington Post story

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