September best month for acquiring mobile app customers

According to new research by Liftoff, seasonality, gender, and the likelihood of repeat purchases play important roles in retailers' mobile marketing strategy.

Liftoff, a performance-based mobile app marketing platform, analyzed data from 44 of the most popular shopping apps between May 2015 and April 2016. Results showed that September was the strongest month for acquiring shoppers ahead of the holiday season. July, November and December were the most expensive months to attain users, costing 70.5 percent more than in September.

In-app purchases played a big role in the booming e-commerce sales on Black Friday 2015. AppsFlyer reported that in-app sales were 45 percent higher on Black Friday than Cyber Monday.

Shoppers who make a purchase are the most valuable, as the average mobile purchaser makes three or more transactions and spends an average of $68 per order within 5.5 months. However, only 4.3 percent of users who install a shopping app go on to make a first purchase. On average, marketers spend $114 acquiring a new user who goes on to complete a purchase.

Looking at genders, men and women cost the same to acquire, but women are 27 percent more likely to make a first purchase than male shoppers, and do so more quickly. Most women make a purchase just 4.5 days after install, compared to men taking 6.8 days. When it comes to spend, the numbers are close, with men averaging about $66 per purchase and women $68 per purchase.

For more:
- see this Liftoff press release

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