Save-A-Lot testing customized stores by ethnicity

Supervalu (NYSE:SVU) is trying out a customized approach in some Save-A-Lot stores. The test is using format modifications to appeal to different cultural groups.

"These stores have been merchandised to better accommodate the unique backgrounds, food preferences and shopping needs of many other customers in the markets we serve, which results in a more relevant in-store experience," CEO Sam Duncan told analysts this week, reported Supermarket News.

The company did not reveal which cultures it was focusing on, but Duncan said he wanted the merchandising to be very specific in its break down. For example, he stated that there are several Hispanic divisions, including Caribbean Hispanics and Mexican Hispanics.

A recent meat-cutting program that rolled out at corporate Save-A-Lot stores also allows Supervalu to cater that department's offerings to local ethnicities. Although most stores already had meat-cutting programs before the initiative, they are now participating in the corporate price investment and marketing aspects.

Last year, Supervalu was one of several retailers to report a data breach, announcing that cybercriminals had accessed payment card transactions at 180 stores.

Over the summer, the company announced that it would turn its attention to the wholesale business, with the exception of plans to grow its discount chain, Save-A-Lot.

For more:
-See this Supermarket News article

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