Samsung debuts flagship store with no products

Samsung just opened a large flagship store in New York's Meatpacking district, but the 40,000-sq.-ft. facility sells no products. Rather, the location is meant to host events and create an immersive experience for customers.

The store—called Samsung 837, after its address—sits across from the High Line near other cultural landmarks, including the Whitney Museum of American Art. There's a three-story digital screen, a 90-seat theater, art gallery, kitchen, cafe and multimedia studio, according to Fast Company.


Instead of selling mobile devices or TVs, Samsung 837 will host events. The first will be an Academy Awards viewing party for Samsung Galaxy owners this Sunday.

"We didn't want it to be a store," general manager Zach Overton told Fast Company. "We didn't want it to be about pushing products in people's faces." Overton described the location as an "immersive cultural center."

Employees will be able to assist customers interested in buying a Samsung product, but the emphasis here is on the experience. 

Experience is playing an increasingly important role in retail. Stores are adding restaurants, cafes and interactive experiences at a rapid rate. Samsung and AT&T last week debuted virtual reality displays at select AT&T stores, and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg turned up at a Samsung event during Mobile World Congress in Barcelona this week to extol the promise of VR.

For more:
-See this Fast Company story
-See this Forbes article

Related stories:
AT&T brings virtual reality to stores
North Face brings the outdoors to retail stores
Zappos Las Vegas pop-ups blurs virtual lines with new tech and endless-aisle
Tommy Hilfiger brings virtual reality to stores
Lowe's reveals Innovations Labs, sci-fi Holoroom

Suggested Articles

Costco changes up its menu items, and Alibaba and Guess partner for a physical store.

Janey Whiteside, Walmart's new chief customer officer, is well acquainted with the importance of customer service in modern retail.

Whole Foods will offer deals on Amazon's Prime Day, and tariffs against China are causing pricing hikes.