Mother's Day 2016 will be about experiences

Regardless of whether Mother's Day spending will be up or down this year – there are conflicting reports – it's clear that experiences are edging out more traditional items. It's a continuation of a trend and growing consumer interest. 

Mother's Day spending is expected to be up in 2016 – way up, according to a survey by Ebates. Last year, 35 percent of U.S. shoppers planned to spend between $20 and $50 and only 12 percent planned to spend between $100 and $150.
 
This year, 30 percent intend to spend $51 to $100 on Mother's Day and another 27 percent will spend between $100 and $250.

But the National Retail Federation projects spending this year to be down slightly from 2015's record high of $172.63 per average.

Total spending is expected to reach $21.4 billion, with 84.4 percent of consumers surveyed celebrating the holiday. The average shopper will spend $172.22.

Jewelry remains a popular gift according to NRF's annual survey, with 35 percent of shoppers planning to spend $4.2 billion on shiny objects.

NRF asked consumers for the first time about "gifts of experience" such as tickets to a concert or sporting event. According to the survey, 24.2 percent want to receive such a gift and 22.3 percent plan to give it.

Special outings, dinner and brunch ranked second with $4.1 billion in estimated spending by 55 percent of shoppers and $1.6 billion will go toward personal services, like a day at the spa (22.5 percent).

Flowers, gift cards, apparel and electronics remain popular gift items, and greeting cards are the most commonly purchased gift at 78.4 percent.
 
Perhaps the fact that greeting cards are considered a gift is why 42 percent of moms told Ebates they pick out their own Mother's Day gifts some of the time and 8 percent say they always pick out their own gifts.

For more:
- see this Ebates survey
- see the NRF study

Related Articles:
Mother's Day boosts online sales 15%
Consumers to spend $10 more on Mother's Day than in 2014
Mother's Day spending to top $18B, most will shop online

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