Has Black Friday Gone Too Far?

The FierceRetail Holiday Hotsheet will keep you up-to-date on all of the latest Thanksgiving, Black Friday and holiday retail news.

With Black Friday sales officially kicking off tomorrow, retailers are set to welcome droves of customers looking to score bargain deals and limited-time doorbusters. But with early morning Thanksgiving Day deals and some Pre-Black Friday events that have been going on for days now, has Black Friday extended too far, leading to consumer fatigue?

Experian Marketing Services' research shows that searches on "Black Friday" have been less than half what they were during the same period in 2012. Analysts predict that's because customers are already starting to tire from Black Friday ads and events they've been receiving for up to a month already.

"It is getting harder and harder for shoppers to know when to shop and on what day because it seems like the sales are starting earlier and earlier," Sam Sisakhti, Boston-based entrepreneur and founder and CEO of UsTrendy, told Forbes.

The trend to start Black Friday sales early may be logical given the shorter holiday shopping season and tough economy, but too many messages spread out too early can backfire and cause the consumer to lose interest altogether.

For more see:
This Forbes article

Related FierceRetail Coverage: Holiday Shopping Sales Trends

Consumers' Use of Mobile for Holiday Shopping Soars
NRF: Consumers Getting a Head Start on Holiday Shopping, Purchasing More Gift Cards
Shoppers Will Spend 50 Percent of Their Holiday Budget On Black Friday Sales
Surveys Battle Over Online or In-Store Shopping This Holiday Season
Weaker Holiday Sales Projected, Except for Certain Retailers

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