An EAS Tag That Can Take A Nuking And Keep On Looking

Shoppers do the darnedest things, such as taking home packaging with attached EAS labels and then throwing it into the microwave oven. We're not just talking about reheatable soups but about things like hamburger meat, complete with the styrofoam and ultra-meltable shrinkwrap plastic. Although the molten plastic is poisonous and smells awful, the EAS tag can catch fire. (Note: Fire, plastic chemicals, styrofoam and plenty of radiation is a recipe for a new microwave—and possibly a new kitchen.)

"Typically, people are trying to defrost beef, chicken, etc., in the original package after it is frozen and it's difficult to remove the plastic," said George Cohen, a spokesperson for EAS vendor Checkpoint. Checkpoint on Tuesday (Feb. 19) rolled out what it says is a microwave-safe EAS label. That may sound like a great idea, but when you're faced with an EAS tag or label that refuses to stay deactivated, the idea of frying it in the breakroom's microwave oven was always a nice failsafe.

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