35% of U.S. shoppers won't even browse Alibaba

It looks like U.S. consumers are initially having a standoff reaction to Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba. In a recent survey of more than 3,500 online shoppers in the United States, 35 percent reported they would not browse or buy from Alibaba.

The Bizrate Insight survey found that as many as 63 percent of the shoppers were not at all familiar with Alibaba, reported BizReport. More specifically, younger and female shoppers were least likely to be familiar with the Chinese brand.

Among those shoppers who had heard of Alibaba, 65 percent said they were likely to browse or purchase from it. And 11 percent reported having already interacted with Alibaba in the past. Of those who previously interacted, 80 percent were likely to do so again once the company is fully launched in the United States.

A third of shoppers, 35 percent had reservations about interacting with Alibaba because of long delivery windows; distrust or fear of personal and payment information security; and a preference to buy American made products.

"Alibaba could pave the way for more Chinese e-commerce companies to gain a customer base in the United States," Hayley Silver, VP, Bizrate Insights, told BizReport. "But it will be an immediate challenge for the company to overcome its lack of name recognition among U.S. shoppers and to reassure them that their transactions and information will be safe and secure."

Although the company may be in need of some U.S. consumer education, Alibaba recently took steps to reach out to U.S. retailers. In a new partnership with Alipay ePass, the online payment platform will allow U.S. and other Western retailers access to Chinese shoppers.

For more:
-See this BizReport article

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