Shoppers willing to wait an hour for e-commerce

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Consumers are willing to wait on merchant sites when traffic is high.

Customers are willing to wait longer than most retailers expect. Plus, this waiting time can sometimes increase conversion rates, as consumers have more time to consider their purchase.

In fact, more than 80% of consumers are willing to wait online for up to one hour to enter a website and make a purchase, according to a survey by Queue-it, a developer of virtual waiting rooms.

Queue-it is an intelligent software-as-a-service add-on solution for retail websites that constantly monitors website traffic, generating a queue only when traffic exceeds website limits. When this happens, users exceeding website capacity will be offloaded on a first-come, first-served basis to the queue system and assigned a unique place in line with a queue number. To keep consumers in the know while in line, users are updated with information about their place in line and expected wait time. When capacity on the site opens back up, users are routed back to the site in sequential order.

RELATED: Most e-commerce sites 'disturbingly slow'

According to data from the same Queue-it survey, website traffic increases by 30 times during a large shopping event or national holiday. In addition, 23 times more end users try to access a website in advance of a retail sale, which has the potential to result in website traffic overload. 

“Observing and measuring consumer behaviors is key for any e-commerce business,” said Queue-it CTO and co-founder Martin Pronk. “By analyzing collective consumer experiences across e-commerce companies, we are able to understand the needs of our retailers better while providing key insights that can guide their digital strategy. This can, in turn, lead to smarter business decisions that will lead to increased revenue and more successful campaigns in the future.” 

RELATED: Preparing SMBs for the holiday season

One client, Micro Kickboard, turned to Queue-it for help after an estimated loss of $15,000 on a key spring campaign day, based on 30% of its shoppers not being able to place orders due to website failure.

A few more days remain, as the cutoff for installing Queue-it before the holidays is Nov. 10.

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