Survey Says Consumers Worry About Mobile Wallet Security. But Does That Matter?

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A ComScore survey released on Monday (Feb. 4) reminded us why we hate it when surveys don't give us context. The topic was digital wallets, and among other not-very-surprising tidbits (48 percent of smartphone users surveyed have used PayPal, six times as many as runner-up Google Wallet) was something we've heard often enough: 47 percent say they're concerned about "security/safety/theft/loss of phone" with digital wallets. To its credit, the ComScore report on the survey does point out that consumers don't seem to understand the added security that digital wallets provide. (A real surprise: 29 percent say they have no mobile-wallet concerns.)

But we never see surveys that ask consumers "What concerns, if any, do you have about using a plastic credit or debit card to make purchases?" What percentage would say they’re worried about losing the card or having their wallet stolen? Without that, we don’t know if a question about mobile wallets means anything at all. If most consumers do fret about the risk of a stolen magstripe card but use it anyway, that’s clearly not what’s holding back mobile payments. Our theory: Consumers don't actually care about security at all. Now will somebody please deliver numbers to prove us wrong?