Can Timing Text Ads Make A Difference?

Tools

Charlotte Russe, a 500-store youth apparel chain, recently cited almost 100 percent read-rates on its text messages, which pretty much indicates the lack of understanding of text open-rates. In E-mail, an open-rate means someone has read the subject line and the from line, and then decided the message is worth exploring. In text, "opening" means far less, if anything at all. But that doesn't mean there are no good ways to gauge message effectiveness—redemption rates do a wonderful job—and it also doesn't mean there are not good ways to make those messages get read more often. Consider, for example, a customized honeypot approach—sort of CRM for texting.

Few retailers are using text timing as a means to send such messages more effectively. Most consumers tend to open and respond to texts during certain hours, based on their schedules. To determine those optimal times requires little more than sending some very deep discount offers—offers too good to resist—to get targeted shoppers to respond quickly. By sending two or three such honeypot messages over the same number of weeks (use different days to gather more data), you can map the best times to send messages to those shoppers. This approach goes beyond tailoring the message to the individual shoppers. It also tailors when to send that text.